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WHO Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health 2018

Freitag 21. September 2018 von htm

PRESS RELEASE

Brussels, Belgium, 21st September 2018

We are still number one but hopefully not for long – Europe’s alcohol consumption
WHO Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health 2018

More than 3 million people died as a result of harmful use of alcohol in 2016, according to a report released by the World Health Organization (WHO) today. This represents 1 in 20 deaths. More than three quarters of these deaths were among men. Overall, the harmful use of alcohol causes more than 5% of the global disease burden.

Europe continues to have the highest per capita consumption in the world. The good news is that per capita consumption has decreased by more than 10% since 2010. However, Europe has the highest rates of current drinking among 15–19-year-olds, followed by the Americas (38%) and the Western Pacific (38%). School surveys indicate that, in many countries, alcohol use starts before the age of 15 with very small differences between boys and girls.

European Alcohol Policy Alliance (Eurocare) wants to remind the European Institutions of the Council Conclusions on Cross-border aspects in alcohol policy – tackling harmful use of alcohol during the Estonian Presidency in December 2017.

Mariann Skar, Secretary General of Eurocare said:
“Juncker’s Commission has neglected and ignored alcohol policy. We are still waiting for decision on such, one might imagine, simple issue as whether consumers should have calories on the labels. Not to mention the missed opportunity of Audiovisual Media Services Directive to reduce exposure to alcohol advertising. Last but not least, we still have minimum excise duties from 1992. The progress we are seeing in Europe is because of courageous actions at a Member States level, countries such as Estonia, Lithuania, Poland, Scotland, Finland have implemented progressive alcohol policy solutions’‘.

Member States have clearly shown that there is a will to do more to tackle alcohol related harm. Juncker’s Commission has to quickly increase its efforts to find a way to actualise these Council Conclusions.
Conclusions highlighted several areas of action and call on the European Commission to:

  • Produce and adopt a new EU Alcohol Strategy
  • Monitor and evaluate the adequacy of the current measures in the online advertising of alcoholic beverages
  • Support Member States in the framework of a new Joint Action – RARHA
  • Support research and studies in areas such as for instance cross-border purchases
  • Propose better provisions for alcohol labelling by the end of 2019

WHO’s Global status report on alcohol and health 2018 presents a comprehensive picture of alcohol consumption and the disease burden attributable to alcohol worldwide. It also describes what countries are doing to reduce this burden.

Source: Eurocare, 18/09/21

Kategorie: Advertising, Alcohol taxes, Alerts, Allgemein, consumption, Documents, English Website, Global, Health, Labels, mortality, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention, Publications, Research, Social Costs, Statistics, Watchdogs, WHO, Youth | Keine Kommentare »

Make Alcohol Policy Solutions The Priority They Should Be

Freitag 24. August 2018 von htm

69th IOGT World Congress urges governments to make alcohol policy the priority it should be and calls for Framework Convention on Alcohol Control.

42 countries, 77 delegates and 320 participants all together took part in the 69th session of the IOGT International World Congress. Together they issued the following declaration:

Make Alcohol Policy Solutions The Priority They Should Be

We, the delegates of the 69thIOGT International World Congress “Future Made Here”, gathered to galvanize fresh momentum in our efforts to tackle alcohol as major obstacle to sustainable development.

We note with alarm the lack of progress in preventing and reducing alcohol harm in countries around the world.

13 of 17 Sustainable Development Goals are adversely affected by alcohol. Every ten seconds a human being dies due to an alcohol-related cause. Globally, alcohol is the leading risk factor for premature death and disability among people between the ages of 15 to 49. Alcohol harm is decimating our families, hurting our communities, undermining our economic productivity, and impeding progress for all. All this is manufactured and fueled by the alcohol industry, their harmful products and unethical business practices, which include tax avoidance, pervasive marketing and industry self-regulation.

Not only is Big Alcohol ruthlessly pursuing profits with no regard for Human Rights, human dignity, and human well-being. The alcohol industry is also engaging in aggressive political activities to undermine, derail and obstruct evidence-based and cost-effective alcohol policy measures that would benefit people and societies.

We are deeply concerned about the fact that our governments are dangerously off track in fulfilling their commitments to promoting a better life for all through tackling alcohol harm.

Independent science shows that the alcohol policy best buys hold considerable and largely untapped potential to promote health,  foster development and to protect especially vulnerable groups like children and youth, women and people in deprived and marginalized communities. For example, a $1 investment in the alcohol policy best buy measures generates a return of $9 dollars. These alcohol policy best buys are important tools to help achieve the SDGs.

The lack of progress in policy implementation and enforcement since the adoption of the WHO Global Alcohol Strategy in 2010 make the need for a binding international agreement abundantly clear.

Therefore, we call for the adoption of a Framework Convention on Alcohol Control. In the era of the Agenda 2030, sustainable development will not be possible without renewed and high-level political commitment and persistent, evidence-based action to prevent and reduce alcohol harm.

It is high-time that governments make alcohol policy solutions the priority they should be in order to achieve development for all.

Source: IOGT International

Kategorie: adults, Advertising, Alcohol industry, Alerts, Alkoholindustrie, Allgemein, Availability, consumption, Development, Documents, Dokumente, Events, Global, Health, mortality, Non-communicable diseases, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention, Price, Research, Social Costs, societal effects, Statistics, Watchdogs | Keine Kommentare »

Big Alcohol, Big Oil and Big Pharma hold meeting in the heart of the UN

Donnerstag 23. August 2018 von htm

New York, United Nations, July 19, 2018 – Civil society groups express deep concern about presence of harmful industries at the United Nations and during the UN High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development  

On July 12, 2018, front groups for Big Alcohol, Big Oil and Big Pharma were inexplicably granted access into the heart of the UN to host a side event as part of the official program of the UN High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF).

The HLPF is the premier body of the United Nations to assess and discuss the implementation of the Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). [1] The HLPF is convening at the United Nations in New York between July 10-18, bringing together more than 2000 participants from civil society and other stakeholder groups with more than 100 ministers from governments around the world. The purpose of the meeting is to jointly assess global and national progress and challenges in achieving the SDGs. During the eight days of the HLPF, a total of 190 side events are being organized. And here is where it gets ugly.

Two front groups for some of the most harmful industries in the world joined with the UN Office of Partnerships to host a side event about private sector initiatives to promote sustainable development. [2] Masquerading as a “not-for-profit” organization, the International Alliance for Responsible Drinking (IARD) is the lobby arm representing 11 of the biggest alcohol producers in the world [3], while GBCHealth is the front group for Big Oil, Big Pharma and other industries harmful to health and development. [4]

The fact that private sector invitation-only events take place in the heart of the UN is deeply concerning. In this way, well-funded private sector front groups are able to monopolize the conversation on matters of public concern, further fueling problems of intransparency and monopolizing the definition of problems and accepted solutions. Harmful industries should have no place at discussions about solutions to the problems that their products, business models and business practices are causing in the first place. 

In a time of shrinking space for civil society, front groups funded by harmful industries can pay their way to prime access to the UN and decision-makers. The event was held in the UN Secretariat Building, West Terrace, where only few can afford to rent meeting rooms and other associated costs. Basic analysis of the official HLPF program shows that only about 20% of all side events list civil society groups as primary organizer. Many civil society event applications were rejected and therefore had to find affordable space outside UN premises.

This event is also deeply concerning because alcohol is a massive obstacle to development, adversely affecting 13 of 17 SDGs, killing one human being every 10 seconds, fueling poverty, inequality, violence, including gender-based violence, and vast economic and productivity losses. [5] [6] The corporations represented by the IARD have a horrific track record of human rights abuses [7], exploitation of women and girls [8], use of tax avoidance schemes [9] [10], institutional ties with the tobacco and other harmful industries [11] [12], marketing techniques and strategies that expose children, adolescents and youth to alcohol [13], and misrepresentation of the science about the harmfulness of their products [14].

All of these corporations attack evidence-based and WHO-recommended public policies and interventions that help save and improve lives by reducing and preventing alcohol harm – because these policies would jeopardize their profits. [15]

Extractive industries, like Big Oil, often undermine effective measures against climate change and for transformation towards sustainable development. The adverse effects of their business practices extend across the SDGs. [16]

These facts clearly show the conflict of interest at work when harmful industries like Big Alcohol, Big Oil and Big Pharma engage in conversations about health and development.

However, at the side event, which was part of the official HLPF program, none of these facts could be highlighted because the event was invitation only, excluding selected civil society groups. And so, in the heart of the UN and during a most important meeting to discuss obstacles to sustainable development, harmful industries were able to spread misinformation and propaganda.

As civil society groups, representing communities affected by the harms these industries cause to people, families and societies worldwide, we are deeply concerned about this event and what it represents.

We are concerned about the absence of quality standards for HLPF side events. We are also concerned about the lack of conflict of interest safeguards.

We strongly oppose the shrinking space for civil society and ever increasing platforms for harmful private interests. We are against the role of the UN Office of Partnerships, promoting harmful industries that undermine and attack policies and guidelines of other UN agencies.

We are concerned about Human Rights compliance of harmful industries and their attempts to use the United Nations to white and green wash the real harms they cause to human and planetary health and well-being.

We are concerned about the integrity and effectiveness of the HLPF and our collective ability to find the most comprehensive solutions to achieve sustainable development for all, not just for a few corporate giants.

Link to IOGT Intern. with List of signatories

Kategorie: adults, Advertising, Alcohol industry, Alerts, Allgemein, consumption, Documents, English Website, Events, Global, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention, societal effects, Watchdogs | Keine Kommentare »

DRUNK, DISRUPTIVE AIR PASSENGER NUMBERS ON THE RISE

Mittwoch 22. August 2018 von htm

 Report shows that 6 in 10 people have encountered drunk passengers following a six-fold increase in passenger incidents on planes since 2012

Almost two thirds of British adults who travel by air (60%) have encountered drunk passengers whilst traveling by air, according to a report published today.

Fit to Fly, by the Institute of Alcohol Studies and the European Alcohol Policy Alliance, found that the majority (51%) of Brits believe there is a serious problem with excessive alcohol consumption in air travel. Drunk passengers who become aggressive on planes threaten the safety of other passengers, including children. Cabin crew have reported being sexually assaulted, kicked, punched and headbutted by drunk passengers.1

Though it is an offence to be drunk on a plane, incidents of drunk and disruptive passengers have increased in recent years, up 600% since 2012,2 according to the Civil Aviation Authority, the body which regulates air travel in the UK. Fit to Fly finds that nearly a quarter of GB adults (24%) drink alcohol at the airport, and only 2% of adults reported drinking four drinks or more, indicating that a minority of passengers drinking excessively may be putting other passengers’ safety at risk.

Kategorie: adults, Alerts, Allgemein, Availability, consumption, Documents, Dokumente, English Website, Global, Health, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention, Research, societal effects, Statistics, Transportation, Violence and crimes, Watchdogs, Workplace | Keine Kommentare »

New study on alcohol promotion and youth

Donnerstag 1. März 2018 von htm

Rossen, I., Pettigrew, S., Jongenelis, M., Stafford, J., Wakefield,
M., and Chikritzhs, T. (2017).
Evidence on the nature and extent of alcohol promotion and the consequences for young people’s alcohol consumption. Report prepared for the Mental Health Commission by the WA Cancer Prevention Research Unit, Curtin University School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Perth, Western Australia.

Executive Summary
Alcohol consumption is a leading contributor to the global burden of disease and death.
Given the harms attributable to alcohol, there is a need to examine the factors that contribute
to its consumption. One known influence is alcohol promotion. The alcohol industry is a
multinational entity that devotes substantial resources to the promotion of alcohol. There is
evidence to suggest that these efforts have become increasingly sophisticated and widespread
in recent years. As well as traditional forms of media such as television and magazines,
alcohol is promoted through less explicit means such as sports sponsorship and alcoholbranded
merchandise. Alcohol is also increasingly promoted via newer forms of media, such
as social media platforms. This report provides an overview of the nature, extent, and impact
of alcohol promotion, with a specific focus on the influence of alcohol promotion on young
people.
Major findings and more: link to the report

Source: EUCAM Newsletter 03/01/2018

Kategorie: Advertising, Alcohol industry, Allgemein, consumption, Global, Newsletter, Politics, Prevention, Research, Statistics, Watchdogs, Youth | Keine Kommentare »

California’s 4 A.M. Last Call Bill 86’d for Now

Sonntag 24. September 2017 von htm

Public health & safety grassroots advocacy trumps
nightlife industry’s push for greater profit.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA (September 22, 2017) – California Alcohol Policy Alliance (CAPA), and Alcohol Justice are breathing a hard-fought sigh of relief as the 2017 California legislative session draws to a close because at least one bill was notably—and mercifully—absent—the 4 A.M. Bar Bill.

read more

 

Kategorie: adults, Alcohol industry, Alkoholindustrie, Allgemein, Availability, consumption, English Website, Internationales, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention, Violence and crimes, Watchdogs | Keine Kommentare »

WHO: new report on alcohol-attributable deaths in Europe

Sonntag 30. Oktober 2016 von htm

For the first time, trends in alcohol consumption and related mortality have been examined systematically for all countries in the WHO European Region for an extended period. (including Switzerland)

Who/Europe’s new report „Public health successes and missed opportunities. Trends in alcohol  consumption attributable deaths increased by 4%.

Kategorie: Addiction, adults, Allgemein, consumption, Documents, Dokumente, Gender, Gesundheit, Health, mortality, Politics, Politik, Prevention, Publications, Research, Schweiz, Statistics, Statistik, Watchdogs, Weltgesundheits-Org., WHO | Keine Kommentare »

EU: NGOS RESIGN FROM HEALTH FORUM

Mittwoch 3. Juni 2015 von htm

Eurocare Press Release: NGOS RESIGN FROM HEALTH FORUM AS COMMISSION IGNORES MEMBER STATE AND EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT CALLS FOR ALCOHOL STRATEGY

Public Health NGOs have today resigned from the EU Alcohol and Health Forum, following the announcement by Commissioner Andriukaitis that he has no plans to establish a new EU Alcohol Strategy[1]. The Commissioner’s decision goes against demands from Member States and the European Parliament for a new comprehensive Strategy to tackle alcohol harm in Europe.

Membership of the Forum, which is chaired by DG Sante, includes drinks industry representatives and public health NGOs. More than 20 health bodies, including Eurocare (European Alcohol Policy Alliance), EPHA (European Public Health Alliance) and the CPME (Standing Committee of European Doctors) today tendered their collective resignation in an open letter to Commissioner Andriukaitis.

Signatories to the letter outline their “deep concerns” about the neglect of public health and the prioritisation of alcohol industry interests. These include:

·        The Commission is ignoring calls from the European Parliament and Member States to develop a new EU Alcohol Strategy

·        The Commission plans to include alcohol within a wider framework for tackling chronic disease, which would fail to address many harms caused by alcohol to those other than the drinker, such as drink driving, domestic abuse and child sexual exploitation

·        There is no evidence to show that the EU Alcohol and Health Forum has had any impact on public health

·        The Forum was established to support the implementation of the previous EU Alcohol Strategy, which ended in 2012. With no new Strategy planned, membership of the Forum cannot be justified.

Signatories also expressed disappointment that the Commissioner had rejected requests for public health experts to have a formal structure to meet with Commission officials to discuss alcohol policy, free from vested interest groups.

Mariann Skar, Secretary General of Eurocare, said: “The Commissioner himself stated drinking behaviours in Europe are good for the Alcohol Industry but not good for Health. Eurocare represents 58 organisations in 25 countries and we deeply regret the Commission’s decision not to establish a new EU Alcohol Strategy. This flies in the face of persistent demands from Member States, the European Parliament and NGOs. The EU is the heaviest drinking region in the world and with 120,000 premature deaths related to alcohol each year, we absolutely must have a comprehensive strategy to tackle alcohol harm.”

Professor Sir Ian Gilmore, Chair of the EU Alcohol and Health Forum’s Science Group said, “This is a sad day for those who care about health in Europe. The Commission’s prioritisation of alcohol industry interests over public health has been laid bare. Many NGOs have participated actively and in good faith in the EU Alcohol and Health Forum, in the hope of making progress and reducing alcohol harm. However, with no evidence to indicate the Forum has achieved any meaningful results, and no promise of a new Alcohol Strategy, we see no alternative to walking away from this failing organization.”

Nina Renshaw, Secretary General of EPHA, said, „The alcohol industry must have raised a few glasses to DG SANTE after their admission at the last Forum meeting that they don’t even aim to improve health. The Commission has finally admitted what the health community has long suspected – that they have abandoned alcohol policy altogether.  The Forum has proved worse than useless, a free PR front for the industry. The Commission even endorses the industry introducing drinking culture to young kids by promoting „responsible“ drinking in primary schools. The health community had to call time on this charade.“

Kategorie: Alcohol industry, Alkoholindustrie, Allgemein, English Website, European Alcohol and Health Forum, Global, Health, Non-communicable diseases, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention, Publications, Watchdogs | Keine Kommentare »

OECD launched its report “Tackling Harmful Alcohol Use”

Dienstag 12. Mai 2015 von htm

Yesterday, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) launched its report “Tackling Harmful Alcohol Use”, a report assessing alcohol policy scenarios. The report has been developed over the last years and the European Alcohol Policy Alliance (Eurocare) welcomes the report and its strong recommendations for governments to implement evidence based and cost-effective alcohol policies.

Mariann Skar, Secretary General of the European Alcohol Policy Alliance, says: “Today OECD has presented a strong message to European Governments, the European Commission and the public health community. Even the most expensive interventions like health care and work place interventions are cost-effective and will give both an economic and health benefit when implemented. Most alcohol policies are not expensive to implement and leads to great health and economic benefits. Furthermore, the report shows the importance of addressing broad policy approaches such as price and marketing in addition to policies addressing only the ones who drink most”.

OECD launched its report yesterday at 11 am at OECD in Paris and at the Royal Statistical Society in London. The report and OECD press releases can be found here. 

The report comes in a time of great discussions on alcohol policies in the European Union. In April 2015, the European Health Ministers agreed on the need for common EU Alcohol Policies and addressed the need for more developments from the European Commission. Later the same month, the European Parliament adopted a resolution calling for a new EU Alcohol Strategy. These calls both respond to the lack of new initiatives from the European Commission, after the previous EU Alcohol Strategy which technically expired in 2012. The OECD report gives important knowledge to the discussion and policy recommendations to the Member States and the European Commission in their upcoming initiatives addressing alcohol related harm.
(Source: Eurocare)

Comment: Swiss politicians will ignore it as usual.

 

Kategorie: Allgemein, Global, Health, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention, Publications, Social Costs, societal effects, Watchdogs | Keine Kommentare »

Das EU-Parlament fordert eine neue Alkohol-Strategie

Donnerstag 7. Mai 2015 von htm

European Parliament Resolution calls for new EU Alcohol Strategy

29 April, Brussels– Today, the European Parliament (EP) adopted a Resolution calling on the European Commission to present a new EU Alcohol Strategy to tackle health harm for 2016-2022. The clear message from MEPs comes just a week after EU Health Ministers meeting in Riga called on the Commission (1) to take action on the health impacts of alcohol. Both MEPs and Ministers have criticized the Commission for failing to update the previous EU Alcohol Strategy which expired in 2012.

Kategorie: Allgemein, Documents, Europaparlament / EU-Kommission, Global, Health, Internationales, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention | Keine Kommentare »

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