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WHO Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health 2018

Freitag 21. September 2018 von htm

PRESS RELEASE

Brussels, Belgium, 21st September 2018

We are still number one but hopefully not for long – Europe’s alcohol consumption
WHO Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health 2018

More than 3 million people died as a result of harmful use of alcohol in 2016, according to a report released by the World Health Organization (WHO) today. This represents 1 in 20 deaths. More than three quarters of these deaths were among men. Overall, the harmful use of alcohol causes more than 5% of the global disease burden.

Europe continues to have the highest per capita consumption in the world. The good news is that per capita consumption has decreased by more than 10% since 2010. However, Europe has the highest rates of current drinking among 15–19-year-olds, followed by the Americas (38%) and the Western Pacific (38%). School surveys indicate that, in many countries, alcohol use starts before the age of 15 with very small differences between boys and girls.

European Alcohol Policy Alliance (Eurocare) wants to remind the European Institutions of the Council Conclusions on Cross-border aspects in alcohol policy – tackling harmful use of alcohol during the Estonian Presidency in December 2017.

Mariann Skar, Secretary General of Eurocare said:
“Juncker’s Commission has neglected and ignored alcohol policy. We are still waiting for decision on such, one might imagine, simple issue as whether consumers should have calories on the labels. Not to mention the missed opportunity of Audiovisual Media Services Directive to reduce exposure to alcohol advertising. Last but not least, we still have minimum excise duties from 1992. The progress we are seeing in Europe is because of courageous actions at a Member States level, countries such as Estonia, Lithuania, Poland, Scotland, Finland have implemented progressive alcohol policy solutions’‘.

Member States have clearly shown that there is a will to do more to tackle alcohol related harm. Juncker’s Commission has to quickly increase its efforts to find a way to actualise these Council Conclusions.
Conclusions highlighted several areas of action and call on the European Commission to:

  • Produce and adopt a new EU Alcohol Strategy
  • Monitor and evaluate the adequacy of the current measures in the online advertising of alcoholic beverages
  • Support Member States in the framework of a new Joint Action – RARHA
  • Support research and studies in areas such as for instance cross-border purchases
  • Propose better provisions for alcohol labelling by the end of 2019

WHO’s Global status report on alcohol and health 2018 presents a comprehensive picture of alcohol consumption and the disease burden attributable to alcohol worldwide. It also describes what countries are doing to reduce this burden.

Source: Eurocare, 18/09/21

Kategorie: Advertising, Alcohol taxes, Alerts, Allgemein, consumption, Documents, English Website, Global, Health, Labels, mortality, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention, Publications, Research, Social Costs, Statistics, Watchdogs, WHO, Youth | Keine Kommentare »

Make Alcohol Policy Solutions The Priority They Should Be

Freitag 24. August 2018 von htm

69th IOGT World Congress urges governments to make alcohol policy the priority it should be and calls for Framework Convention on Alcohol Control.

42 countries, 77 delegates and 320 participants all together took part in the 69th session of the IOGT International World Congress. Together they issued the following declaration:

Make Alcohol Policy Solutions The Priority They Should Be

We, the delegates of the 69thIOGT International World Congress “Future Made Here”, gathered to galvanize fresh momentum in our efforts to tackle alcohol as major obstacle to sustainable development.

We note with alarm the lack of progress in preventing and reducing alcohol harm in countries around the world.

13 of 17 Sustainable Development Goals are adversely affected by alcohol. Every ten seconds a human being dies due to an alcohol-related cause. Globally, alcohol is the leading risk factor for premature death and disability among people between the ages of 15 to 49. Alcohol harm is decimating our families, hurting our communities, undermining our economic productivity, and impeding progress for all. All this is manufactured and fueled by the alcohol industry, their harmful products and unethical business practices, which include tax avoidance, pervasive marketing and industry self-regulation.

Not only is Big Alcohol ruthlessly pursuing profits with no regard for Human Rights, human dignity, and human well-being. The alcohol industry is also engaging in aggressive political activities to undermine, derail and obstruct evidence-based and cost-effective alcohol policy measures that would benefit people and societies.

We are deeply concerned about the fact that our governments are dangerously off track in fulfilling their commitments to promoting a better life for all through tackling alcohol harm.

Independent science shows that the alcohol policy best buys hold considerable and largely untapped potential to promote health,  foster development and to protect especially vulnerable groups like children and youth, women and people in deprived and marginalized communities. For example, a $1 investment in the alcohol policy best buy measures generates a return of $9 dollars. These alcohol policy best buys are important tools to help achieve the SDGs.

The lack of progress in policy implementation and enforcement since the adoption of the WHO Global Alcohol Strategy in 2010 make the need for a binding international agreement abundantly clear.

Therefore, we call for the adoption of a Framework Convention on Alcohol Control. In the era of the Agenda 2030, sustainable development will not be possible without renewed and high-level political commitment and persistent, evidence-based action to prevent and reduce alcohol harm.

It is high-time that governments make alcohol policy solutions the priority they should be in order to achieve development for all.

Source: IOGT International

Kategorie: adults, Advertising, Alcohol industry, Alerts, Alkoholindustrie, Allgemein, Availability, consumption, Development, Documents, Dokumente, Events, Global, Health, mortality, Non-communicable diseases, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention, Price, Research, Social Costs, societal effects, Statistics, Watchdogs | Keine Kommentare »

Big Alcohol, Big Oil and Big Pharma hold meeting in the heart of the UN

Donnerstag 23. August 2018 von htm

New York, United Nations, July 19, 2018 – Civil society groups express deep concern about presence of harmful industries at the United Nations and during the UN High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development  

On July 12, 2018, front groups for Big Alcohol, Big Oil and Big Pharma were inexplicably granted access into the heart of the UN to host a side event as part of the official program of the UN High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF).

The HLPF is the premier body of the United Nations to assess and discuss the implementation of the Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). [1] The HLPF is convening at the United Nations in New York between July 10-18, bringing together more than 2000 participants from civil society and other stakeholder groups with more than 100 ministers from governments around the world. The purpose of the meeting is to jointly assess global and national progress and challenges in achieving the SDGs. During the eight days of the HLPF, a total of 190 side events are being organized. And here is where it gets ugly.

Two front groups for some of the most harmful industries in the world joined with the UN Office of Partnerships to host a side event about private sector initiatives to promote sustainable development. [2] Masquerading as a “not-for-profit” organization, the International Alliance for Responsible Drinking (IARD) is the lobby arm representing 11 of the biggest alcohol producers in the world [3], while GBCHealth is the front group for Big Oil, Big Pharma and other industries harmful to health and development. [4]

The fact that private sector invitation-only events take place in the heart of the UN is deeply concerning. In this way, well-funded private sector front groups are able to monopolize the conversation on matters of public concern, further fueling problems of intransparency and monopolizing the definition of problems and accepted solutions. Harmful industries should have no place at discussions about solutions to the problems that their products, business models and business practices are causing in the first place. 

In a time of shrinking space for civil society, front groups funded by harmful industries can pay their way to prime access to the UN and decision-makers. The event was held in the UN Secretariat Building, West Terrace, where only few can afford to rent meeting rooms and other associated costs. Basic analysis of the official HLPF program shows that only about 20% of all side events list civil society groups as primary organizer. Many civil society event applications were rejected and therefore had to find affordable space outside UN premises.

This event is also deeply concerning because alcohol is a massive obstacle to development, adversely affecting 13 of 17 SDGs, killing one human being every 10 seconds, fueling poverty, inequality, violence, including gender-based violence, and vast economic and productivity losses. [5] [6] The corporations represented by the IARD have a horrific track record of human rights abuses [7], exploitation of women and girls [8], use of tax avoidance schemes [9] [10], institutional ties with the tobacco and other harmful industries [11] [12], marketing techniques and strategies that expose children, adolescents and youth to alcohol [13], and misrepresentation of the science about the harmfulness of their products [14].

All of these corporations attack evidence-based and WHO-recommended public policies and interventions that help save and improve lives by reducing and preventing alcohol harm – because these policies would jeopardize their profits. [15]

Extractive industries, like Big Oil, often undermine effective measures against climate change and for transformation towards sustainable development. The adverse effects of their business practices extend across the SDGs. [16]

These facts clearly show the conflict of interest at work when harmful industries like Big Alcohol, Big Oil and Big Pharma engage in conversations about health and development.

However, at the side event, which was part of the official HLPF program, none of these facts could be highlighted because the event was invitation only, excluding selected civil society groups. And so, in the heart of the UN and during a most important meeting to discuss obstacles to sustainable development, harmful industries were able to spread misinformation and propaganda.

As civil society groups, representing communities affected by the harms these industries cause to people, families and societies worldwide, we are deeply concerned about this event and what it represents.

We are concerned about the absence of quality standards for HLPF side events. We are also concerned about the lack of conflict of interest safeguards.

We strongly oppose the shrinking space for civil society and ever increasing platforms for harmful private interests. We are against the role of the UN Office of Partnerships, promoting harmful industries that undermine and attack policies and guidelines of other UN agencies.

We are concerned about Human Rights compliance of harmful industries and their attempts to use the United Nations to white and green wash the real harms they cause to human and planetary health and well-being.

We are concerned about the integrity and effectiveness of the HLPF and our collective ability to find the most comprehensive solutions to achieve sustainable development for all, not just for a few corporate giants.

Link to IOGT Intern. with List of signatories

Kategorie: adults, Advertising, Alcohol industry, Alerts, Allgemein, consumption, Documents, English Website, Events, Global, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention, societal effects, Watchdogs | Keine Kommentare »

New study on alcohol promotion and youth

Donnerstag 1. März 2018 von htm

Rossen, I., Pettigrew, S., Jongenelis, M., Stafford, J., Wakefield,
M., and Chikritzhs, T. (2017).
Evidence on the nature and extent of alcohol promotion and the consequences for young people’s alcohol consumption. Report prepared for the Mental Health Commission by the WA Cancer Prevention Research Unit, Curtin University School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Perth, Western Australia.

Executive Summary
Alcohol consumption is a leading contributor to the global burden of disease and death.
Given the harms attributable to alcohol, there is a need to examine the factors that contribute
to its consumption. One known influence is alcohol promotion. The alcohol industry is a
multinational entity that devotes substantial resources to the promotion of alcohol. There is
evidence to suggest that these efforts have become increasingly sophisticated and widespread
in recent years. As well as traditional forms of media such as television and magazines,
alcohol is promoted through less explicit means such as sports sponsorship and alcoholbranded
merchandise. Alcohol is also increasingly promoted via newer forms of media, such
as social media platforms. This report provides an overview of the nature, extent, and impact
of alcohol promotion, with a specific focus on the influence of alcohol promotion on young
people.
Major findings and more: link to the report

Source: EUCAM Newsletter 03/01/2018

Kategorie: Advertising, Alcohol industry, Allgemein, consumption, Global, Newsletter, Politics, Prevention, Research, Statistics, Watchdogs, Youth | Keine Kommentare »

USA: Alcohol Ads Violating Industry Rules More Likely in Magazines Popular With Teens

Donnerstag 9. August 2012 von htm

Alcohol ads that violate industry guidelines are more likely to appear in magazines popular with teen readers, a new study finds. Ads violate industry guidelines if they appear to target a primarily underage audience, highlight the high alcohol content of a product, or portray drinking in conjunction with activities that require a high degree of alertness or coordination, such as swimming.

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health studied 1,261 ads for alcopops, beer, spirits or wine that appeared more than 2,500 times in 11 magazines that are popular among teens. The ads were rated according to a number of factors, such as whether they portrayed over-consumption of alcohol, addiction content, sex-related content, or injury content. ….
(Source:Join Together, 08/09/12)

Kategorie: Advertising, Alcohol industry, Allgemein, Children, consumption, Global, Media, Parents, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention, Research, Statistics, Watchdogs, Youth | Keine Kommentare »

UK: Health Select Committee report delivers verdict on Government alcohol strategy

Freitag 20. Juli 2012 von htm

EdA Health Committee report has given a mixed, if not critical, verdict on the Government’s Alcohol Strategy published earlier this year.

Download the 3rd report into the Government’s alcohol strategy (pdf), chapter index here and the Commons press release.

Although supportive of some aspects of the strategy, including the headline announcement of minimum pricing, the report is critical of an excessive focus on binge drinking over health issues and the lack of a delivery framework in the strategy. It also speaks out on alcohol industry denial over alcohol advertising effects on consumption. Although not against the principle of the controversial responsibility deal, it warns it should not be a substitute for government policy and should be regarded as standard corporate responsibility, rather than something to be praised for.

Launching the Committee’s report, the Chair, Rt Hon Stephen Dorrell MP, said:

„The main focus of the strategy is binge drinking and its consequences for anti-social behaviour and public disorder. Those are important issues, but the health impact of chronic alcohol misuse is in our view also significant and greater emphasis needs to be placed on addressing that impact.“ ….
(Source: Alcohol Policy UK, 07/19/12)

Kategorie: Addiction, Advertising, Alcohol industry, Allgemein, Binge Drinking, consumption, Global, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention, Price, Publications, societal effects, Watchdogs, Youth | Keine Kommentare »

EUCAM Newsletter for June 2012

Donnerstag 5. Juli 2012 von htm

The new EUCAM Newsletter with Fact Sheets on sport sponsoring by alcohol producers in Europe, kids being overexposed to irresponsible alcohol marketing and more…
Newsletter

Kategorie: Advertising, Alcohol industry, Allgemein, Children, consumption, Global, Media, Publications, Research, societal effects, Statistics, Watchdogs, Youth | Keine Kommentare »

AU: Sports get $25m to curb binge drinking

Samstag 30. Juni 2012 von htm

TWELVE sports associations will become teetotal when it comes to alcohol sponsorship after a $25 million deal with the government.

The groups have struck a deal to promote safe alcohol consumption by adults, alcohol-free sporting environments for minors and to reduce alcohol promotion in their codes.

But the AFL and NRL were not part of the deal. Those that do have a stake include national associations for soccer, basketball, netball, swimming, cycling, hockey, athletics, skateboarding, volleyball, equestrian, triathlon and canoeing. They will be precluded from sponsorship that promotes alcohol consumption as it would be in conflict with the health campaign message of Be the Influence, Tackling Binge Drinking.

(Source: Harvard World Health News, 06/29/12) smh.com.au, 06/24/12

Kategorie: adults, Advertising, Allgemein, Documents, Global, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention, societal effects, Sports, Youth | Keine Kommentare »

Eurocare Newsletter 6/2012

Donnerstag 21. Juni 2012 von htm

In Focus
Launch of Eurocare recommendations for a future EU alcohol strategy
Estonia is developing an alcohol policy green paper

News from Eurocare
Actis (Norway): The Government says no to curbing serving hours
Alcohol and Society (Denmark) challenges Carlsberg over the promotion of alcohol in Denmark
Alcohol Focus Scotland: Scottish policy developments
SLAN (Sweden): Summer updates

News from the European Union Institutions
Presentations from the 10th meeting of the Committee on National Alcohol Policy and Action
EU Health Programme – Annual report 2010
Health-EU Portal survey ….

News from across Europe

New research and reports

Upcoming events
(Source: Eurocare, 06/19/12)

Kategorie: Advertising, Alcohol industry, Allgemein, Global, Newsletter, Parliaments / Governments, Politics, Prevention, Publications, Research, Sports, Statistics, Watchdogs, Youth | Keine Kommentare »

Alcohol Industry v Health Ministry 1:0

Freitag 8. Juni 2012 von htm

Sport is not an arena for alcohol promotion

This weekend, UEFA Euro 2012 kicks off in Warsaw. During the next weeks 1.4 million fans are expected at the stadiums, and millions of people will follow the championship from more than 200 territories around the world. This is a brilliant opportunity to promote sport, physical activity and a healthy lifestyle. However, looking at the sponsors to UEFA Euro 2012, healthy lifestyle is not the message put forward when exposing the audience with sponsors such as Coca Cola, McDonalds and Carlsberg. Carlsberg is one of the leading breweries in the world, and is one of the official sponsors to the UEFA Euro 2012.

In 2009, global sponsorship spending was estimated for 44.8 billion USD; compared to 5.6 billion in 1987. It must be working and paying off. ‘It is extremely disappointing that with such an unique platform UEFA with silent blessing of political leaders is choosing to promote alcohol over health. To associate and brand football together with alcohol is more than problematic. It is simply lack of any long term consideration of the impact bad health will have on the population.’ says Mariann Skar- Secretary General of European Alcohol Policy Alliance. …
(Source: Eurocare, 06/7/12)

Kategorie: Advertising, Alcohol industry, Allgemein, Availability, Binge Drinking, consumption, Events, Global, Non-communicable diseases, Politics, societal effects, Sports, Watchdogs, Youth | Keine Kommentare »

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